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Agricultural, Engineering, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences

Principal Investigator: Darin Acosta
Field of Research: Physics
Phone Number: 846-3144
E-mail: acosta@phys.ufl.edu
Project Description: We are developing algorithms and electronic processors to conduct research in particle physics at two major high-energy physics experiments. The various projects include the analysis of simulation data from high-energy physics interactions, software development, electronics layout and schematic capture, and electronics testing.
Requirements: Two years of undergraduate physics including modern physics. Computer programming experience (Fortran, C, or C++). Experience with Microsoft Windows and/or UNIX.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 1 or 2
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available


Principal Investigator: Chuck Adams
Field of Research: Natural Resource Economics
Phone Number: 392-1826, ext. 223
E-mail: cmadams@ufl.edu
Project Description: I need someone who can work with Excel spreadsheets. Data need to be moved from an on-line database, into a spreadsheet format, and basic data manipulations performed. Specifically, we are trying to track the production of spiny lobster within the Central America / Caribbean / northern South America region. Then we want to develop trends in import and export of spiny lobster amongst the nations within the region... and with countries outside the region.
Requirements: Strong working knowledge of Excel. Self motivated. Interest in looking a trends in annual data. Willingness to complete the task on time once the extent of the work is understood. Have your own computer. Desire to work with UF faculty. Taste for spiny lobsters.
Starting Date: 1 Oct 06
Ending Date: 31 Dec 06
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 0
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Chuck Adams
Field of Research: Natural Resource Economics
Phone Number: 392-1826, ext. 223
E-mail: cmadams@ufl.edu
Project Description: I need someone who can work with Excel spreadsheets. Data need to be moved from an on-line database, into a spreadsheet format, and basic data manipulations performed. Specifically, we are trying to track the production of spiny lobster within the Central America / Caribbean / northern South America region. Then we want to develop trends in import and export of spiny lobster amongst the nations within the region... and with countries outside the region.
Requirements: Strong working knowledge of Excel. Self motivated. Interest in looking a trends in annual data. Willingness to complete the task on time once the extent of the work is understood. Have your own computer. Desire to work with UF faculty. Taste for spiny lobsters.
Starting Date: 1 Oct 06
Ending Date: 31 Dec 06
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 0
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Jean Andino
Field of Research: Chemistry, Environmental
Phone Number: 846-1744
E-mail: andino@ufl.edu
Project Description: Tires are used as an alternative fuel in many industries. However, additional information is needed to assess the types of gas-phase materials that can be formed when tires are gasified and used as fuel sources. This project involves using mass spectrometry techniques to determine the chemical composition of gaseous products that are emitted in tire gasification. The data will ultimately be used to improve waste management practices as well as to assess appropriate air pollution control strategies.
Requirements: 1. Strong motivation to carry out experimental work, and a willingness to invest time. 2. Dedication to carrying out quality research. 3. Basic background in chemistry or chemical engineering, with an interest in learning about air pollution. Note that the student will be trained on the use of the mass spectrometer, so prior experience in using the mass spec is not absolutely necessary, although it would be helpful.
Starting Date: Immediately in Fall 2005
Ending Date: May 2006
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 0
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Alexander Angerhofer
Field of Research: Chemical Physics
Phone Number: 846 3281
E-mail: alex@chem.ufl.edu
Project Description: Quantum computing with ESR (electron spin resonance). Quantum computing is a relatively recent concept which, if realized, would allow massively parallel computing, provided one finds quantum systems which allow for the coherent super- position of a large enough number of individual quantum states. The theory of quantum computing has been developed to a large extent during the last 5 to 10 years. However, experimental realization is scarce. Successful implementation of quantum gates have been demonstrated with NMR. An implementation with ESR and/or optical spectroscopy is highly desirable because of the higher sensitivity of the latter techniques and the potential of using much larger quantum systems which would allow much higher degree of parallelization. The project goals would be to implement and demonstrate the feasibility of quantum gates with ESR.
Requirements: A good introduction to quantum mechanics would be desirable, e.g., CHM4412, PHY3063 or PHY4604. Since the project is advanced a high degree of motivation and desire to get things done is absolutely necessary.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Required
Work Study: Required
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Alexander Angerhofer
Field of Research: Physical Chemistry
Phone Number: 392 9489
E-mail: alex@chem.ufl.edu
Project Description: Carry out vibrational analysis of beta-carotene and other polyenes of biological relevance and compare with FTIR and Raman spectra.
Requirements: must have had introduction to quantum chemistry (CHM4412, or CHM3417, or similar).
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: contact faculty mentor
Summer Positions: contact faculty mentor
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Patrick Antonelli
Field of Research: Otology, Infectious Diseases
Phone Number: 352-392-4461
E-mail: pa@ufl.edu
Project Description: Administration of xylitol-sweetened chewing gum reduces the rate that predisposed children develop ear infections, but we don't know why. This project aims to understand the mechanism of xylitol's action on the respiratory tract by studying the effects of xylitol on the phenotype of oral and nasopharyngeal flora.
Requirements: (1) Completion of course on basic microbiology (2) Prior microbiology laboratory experience (3) 1 year commitment (4) Goal of presenting findings at a national meeting and publishing results.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Scott Banks
Field of Research: Biomechanics Software
Phone Number: 352-392-6109
E-mail: banks@ufl.edu
Project Description: Participate in the development of an orthopedics biomechanics measurement software platform. The software utilizes computer graphics techniques to measure the pose of 3D objects from 2D X-ray images. Computer graphics and image algorithms are main parts of the project. Plugin structure is a major feature of the software and the issues involved can also be an focus of the participation. Further possibilities include integration of physical constraints.
Requirements: Experience with C++ and/or other programming languages. Preferred knowledges/interests: computer graphics (OpenGL, etc), software framework/structure design, data storage techniques, representation of physical constraints in software
Starting Date: open
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Emilio Bruna
Field of Research: Ecology
Phone Number: 846-0634
E-mail: brunae@wec.ufl.edu
Project Description: Populations of plants and animals in ecosystems that have undergone extensive modification by humans (such as fragmentation or alteration of fire regimes) are hypothesized to be at increased risk of extinction. Our lab is using simple mathematical models to investigate the dynamics of plant populations in human-modified ecosystems. For more information, see: www.wec.ufl.edu/faculty/brunae
Requirements: An interest in applying mathematics to the study of ecology. Completion of coursework in matrix algebra and the ability to program in matlab are preferred.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 1-2
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Marian Buszko
Field of Research: Electronics and Computer Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-392-7203
E-mail: marian@ufl.edu
Project Description: Magnetic Resonance Engineering and Interdisciplinary Applications span a very broad range of topics. Depending on student's interest, the individual projects may involve a) printed circuit-board design using CAD tools, b) application-specific integrated circuit design and implementation in programmable logic using VHDL tools, c) system programming in C/C++, d) application programming and graphical user interface design, e) digital signal processing, f) networking and embedded systems, and more.
Requirements: Interest in one of the fields of electronics and/or computer science and engineering, desire to meet and respond to new challenges, excellence in individual work, and accomplishing tasks.
Starting Date: Ongoing
Ending Date: Ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Ronald K. Castellano
Field of Research: Organic Chemistry
Phone Number: (352) 392-2752
E-mail: castellano@chem.ufl.edu
Project Description: Synthesize small molecules (mostly aromatic/heteroaromatic) for studies in molecular recognition, self-assembly, and advanced materials. In particular we are interested in highly functionalized monomers as precursors for conjugated polymers and synthetic receptors. Although this research is largely based in synthetic chemistry and solution-phase characterization (e.g. NMR), aspects of the project will involve computation (for design and study) and X-ray crystallography.
Requirements: Applicants must have had two semesters of Organic Chemistry (CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L)
Starting Date: Open
Ending Date: Ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Bill CASTLE
Field of Research: Horticulture/Citrus
Phone Number: 863.956.1151
E-mail: Castle@crec.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: The performance of citrus trees is highly dependent on the sites and soils where the trees are grown. This is because citrus trees are budded to rootstocks, and rootstocks vary markedly in their adpatation to different soil environmental factors. An important commercial rootstock is performing poorly in many sites throughout the Indian River (Ft. Pierce, Vero Beach) area. We are conducting a grower survey to determine the extent of this problem and to gather data to support the formation of research plans.
Requirements: Survey forms have already been mailed to local growers. We are seeking a person to follow-up with personal contacts to gather certain information and participate in site evaluations. This person would work in the Fort Pierce area. Knowledge of citrus and soils is desired. You would be working under the supervision of our project manager located at the IFAS Indian River Research and Edcuation Center, Fort Pierce.
Starting Date: May 2004
Ending Date: August 2004
Academic Year Positions: 0
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Tina Crosby
Field of Research: Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Phone Number: 352-392-9617 Ext. 230
E-mail: tccrosby@ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: Master's research project in the fish health laboratory. Investigation of an sedative, metomidate hydrochloride, for use in the shipping of ornamental fish. Product is not currently approved for use in the United States. Research will include fish maintenance, water quality, and blood sampling. Blood will be used to determine whole blood glucose and plasma cortisol values. Results will be used as a preliminary study for product use approval in the U.S.
Requirements: Seeking motivated individuals. Previous lab experience is helpful, but not necessary.
Starting Date: 5/15/06
Ending Date: 8/15/06
Academic Year Positions: 0
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Warren Dixon
Field of Research: Visual Servo Control
Phone Number: 000-0000
E-mail: wdixon@ufl.edu
Project Description: Develop software to track feature points in an image to allow a unmanned system to respond to the images. For example, the software would determine from a video, the relative position and orientation of an object (e.g., a satellite rotating, a micro air vehicle, a robot, an unmanned car, etc.). The student would work with graduate students in an in-depth study.
Requirements: Experience with C/C++ programming
Starting Date: ASAP
Ending Date: continuous
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Required
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Michael Dukes
Field of Research: Irrigation and drainage/hydrology
Phone Number: (352) 392-1864 x107
E-mail: mddukes@ufl.edu
Project Description: With all water use categories increasing in Florida each year, efficienct use of water resources will be essential to sustaining the current agriculture, industry, and quality of life. Florida is the largest agricultural water user in the humid region and has the second largest withdrawal of groundwater for public supply in the U.S. Although irrigation is practiced widely in Florida, there are recent advances in computer technology and water devilvery systems that can make irrigation systems more efficient.
Requirements: Willingness to learn research techniques. Some travel from Gainesville will be necessary.
Starting Date: ongoing
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: variable
Summer Positions: variable
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Hugh Fan
Field of Research: Mechanical Eng/Chemistry
Phone Number:
E-mail: hfan@ufl.edu
Project Description: The student will be taught to fabricate microfluidic devices that consists of hairthin microfeatures. The fabrication process involves molding, milling, and lamination. After training, the student will be responsible for producing devices that are primarily used for chemical and biological applications. Some degrees of research may be performed depending on the student's interest.
Requirements: A student in mechanical engineering or chemistry is perferred. A comittment of ~8 hours/week is required. The student should be dependable, hard-working, and willing to learn.
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Kevin Folta
Field of Research: Plant Physiology
Phone Number: 392-3814
E-mail: kfolta@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: I am looking for someone with electronics skills to aid in the design and test of LED arrays. The arrays will be used to study the effects of specific qualities and quantites of light on various facets of plant development. The goal is to design an inexensive prototype for use in the lab, perform basic experiments, then report the data and plans to the community. The field would benefit from an inexpensive standard setup to perform such light manipulations.
Requirements: Electronics skills and an interest in biology.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Richard Frye
Field of Research: Neurophysiology
Phone Number: 352-273-5778
E-mail: fryerich@peds.ufl.edu
Project Description: Learning Disabilities may affect as many as 10-15% of children. Although, educationally -based remediation can help individuals improve their skills, recent research has demonstrated that residual cognitive difficulties extend into adulthood. Despite the advances in our knowledge about the brain and behavior, the neurological basis of many Learning Disabilities is still largely unknown and controversial. We also have ongoing neuroimaging experiments using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional MRI in the Division of Pediatric Neurology. We seek students with interest in linear and non-linear neurophysiological signal analysis to assisting in the analysis of MEG data using existing and new innovative analysis techniques.
Requirements: Depending on project, candidate may require knowledge in linear and non-linear signal analysis and neuroimaging and neurophysiologic methods.
Starting Date: Open
Ending Date: Ongoing
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Dovie Gamble
Field of Research: All Disciplines
Phone Number: 846-2575
E-mail: dgamble@hhp.ufl.edu
Project Description: The McNair Program is designed to provide undergraduates with effective preparation to enter and complete doctoral programs. Students perform research with a faculty mentor and attend seminars and workshops on topics relevant to doctoral study. Please note that the salary noted below is actually in the form of a Research Stipend.
Requirements: Low income, first generation college student and/or underrepresented minority; U.S. citizen or permanent resident; 3.0 or higher GPA
Starting Date: Fall (each year)
Ending Date: Summer A
Academic Year Positions: 30 funded
Summer Positions: Summer A only
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Alan George
Field of Research: Computer Engineering
Phone Number: 392-5225
E-mail: george@hcs.ufl.edu
Project Description: This project will focus on one or more topics in high-performance computer architectures, networks, systems, and services for applications in parallel, hardware-reconfigurable, distributed, and fault-tolerant computing. In addition to topics focused exclusively in computer engineering, also supported are interdisciplinary problems bridging computational science and computer engineering, often in collaboration with other departments at UF. Dr. George directs the High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Research Lab, a leading research facility in these areas, and undergraduate and graduate projects are supported each semester in many of these areas. The lab is equipped with a broad range of world-class experimental testbeds featuring cutting-edge technologies in high-performance computing and networking. More information on the lab and its active project groups can be found at www.hcs.ufl.edu.
Requirements: IInterest in one of more of the areas cited above, good computer skills, and an interest in future graduate studies in electrical and computer engineering or computer science.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: contact professor
Summer Positions: contact professor
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Alex Green
Field of Research: Biomass Gasification
Phone Number: 392-2001
E-mail: aesgreen@ufl.edu
Project Description: There are several projects being conducted in need of assistance. Projects include biomass gasification, alternative fuels, heat transfer, phytoremediation, and sub-projects that pertain to specialized engineering fields. Looking for serious students in the following fields of study: Chemistry / Chemical Engineering, Applied Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, Industrial / Systems Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering.
Requirements: Students must have good mechanical skills, and have taken Physics w/ Calculus 1 and 2, and Chemistry.
Starting Date: 1/99
Ending Date: no set date
Academic Year Positions: varies
Summer Positions: varies
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Stephen Hagen
Field of Research: Physics / Biological Physics
Phone Number: 392-4716
E-mail:
Project Description: Our laboratory conducts research in biological physics, with focus on time-resolved optical studies of biological macromolecules. Various projects are available for the motivated and independent undergraduate student. Undergraduate projects in the past have included fluorescence spectroscopy, Labview programming, electronic circuit construction, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, quorum sensing in bacteria, protein expression, and more.

See lab website: http://www.phys.ufl.edu/~hagen
Requirements: Interest in working in an interdisciplinary research field, and the ability and motivation to learn a diverse set of laboratory techniques and methods. Academic background must include a year of introductory physics. Additional background in general chemistry and biology or biochemistry is very helpful.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available


Principal Investigator: Paul Holloway
Field of Research: Electronic Materials
Phone Number: 352/846-3330
E-mail: pholl@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Ohmic contacts to wide bandgap semiconductors: The reaction between thin metal films and gallium nitride, silicon carbide and gallium arsenide is being studied. These reactions are critical to the formation of ohmic contacts for light emitting diodes, diode lasers, and high power electrical switching devices. The student will learn about vacuum systems, thin film deposition, electrical characterization of semiconductor contacts, and interfacial metallurgical reactions.
Requirements: Completion of basic physics, chemistry and introductory materials science.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Paul Holloway
Field of Research: Electronic Materials
Phone Number: 352/846-3330
E-mail: pholl@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Development of phosphors for flat panel displays: This project involves the deposition of thin films of luminescent phosphors and their testing under electric field or electron beam excitation. These phosphors are being developed for use in electroluminescent displays and field emission displays. The student will learn about vacuum systems, thin film deposition, optical characterization, and luminescence.
Requirements: Introductory physics,chemistry and materials science.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Jennifer Horton
Field of Research: Materials Science & Engineering (MSE)
Phone Number: 846-3312
E-mail: jhort@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: 2005-06 Research Experience in Materials (REM) - MSE is hosting a 2005 REM. It is open to freshmen and sophomores who are interested in working in a graduate laboratory in MSE. Students will be paid $10/hour for their work in the labs (about 10 hrs/week).
Requirements: Application and resume are required to apply. Applications may be downloaded from the MSE website: http://www.mse.ufl.edu/2005REMApplication.pdf Applications should be submitted to the Academic Services Offices, 108 Rhines Hall, by Friday, September 2, 2005. Decisions will be made mid-September. Any questions should be directed to Jennifer Horton at jhort@mse.ufl.edu or Martha McDonald at mmcdo@mse.ufl.edu
Starting Date: Fall Semester
Ending Date: Spring Semester
Academic Year Positions: 25
Summer Positions: N/A
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: John Jaeger
Field of Research: Geology, Coastal and Marine Geology
Phone Number: 846-1381
E-mail: jaeger@geology.ufl.edu
Project Description: To assist in the analysis of samples and data as part of the following projects:Glacial-marine sedimentology; paleo-hurricane research; estuarine dynamics.
Requirements: Need to have at least GLY 2010C or its equivalent
Starting Date: continuing
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: variable
Summer Positions: variable
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jasmeet Judge
Field of Research: Remote Sensing for hydrology applications
Phone Number: (325)-392-1864 ext 299
E-mail: jasmeet@ufl.edu
Project Description: The amount of water in the soil governs the near-term weather, plant growth, and leaching of nutrients and other chemicals from soil. The research conducted in our group is highly interdisciplinary that combines field work, theory, and computer modeling. In our group we use hydrology and crop growth models to understand the flow of water and energy in the soil and plants. We use microwave remote sensing technology to improve the model estimates of water and energy fluxes. We conduct field experiments that include state-of-the-art instrumentation in hydrology, remote sensing and crop modeling. The applicants will be assigned a project that is of mutual interest to the group and the applicant. It could be data collection and analysis from field work, or working with the crop growth, hydrology, and/or remote sensing models.
Requirements: Applicants should have strong interest and skills in math and physics. Some programming skills would be helpful. All our programs are in Fortran 90, Matlab, and some are in C.
Starting Date: 8/05
Ending Date: 8/07
Academic Year Positions: one
Summer Positions: two
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Tamer Kahveci
Field of Research: Computer Science
Phone Number:
E-mail: tamer@cise.ufl.edu
Project Description: In pharmaceutics, the development of every drug involves two phases, namely discovery and testing. Drug discovery is an expensive process where the main steps are target identification and lead discovery. A target is a biological molecule (e.g., a compound or an enzyme) which is vital for the survival of a disease-causing microorganism, the elimination of which will result in eliminating the microorganism, thereby curing the disease. Enzymes are catalysts of reactions which result in the production of essential metabolites (compounds) in the metabolic network of every living organism. Therefore, it is intuitive to predict candidate drug targets by locating the enzymes which are responsible for the production of vital metabolites in the network. It is also necessary to identify a target set which causes minimum damage to the host organism. The goal of this proposal is to devise efficient computational methods to determine the set of enzymes which is the optimal drug target in a metabolic network. Optimality implies that the inhibition of the resulting set of enzymes achieves the goal with minimum side-effects. In this context, the goal is the deletion of a given set of target compounds and side-effect is the number of non-target compounds whose production is stopped.
Requirements:
Starting Date: 11/1/2005
Ending Date: 11/1/2007
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Robert Kluson
Field of Research: Agroecology
Phone Number: (941) 861-9806
E-mail: rkluson@scgov.net
Project Description: Title: Development of Florida Native Plants in Central Florida as Farmscaping Cover Crops and Vaue-Added Crops Scope of Work: 1) Field seed collections of native plants in central Florida 2) Setup of demonstration seed production sites in Sarasota County 3) Identification of insects collected from flowers of field grown native plants
Requirements: 1) Must have own transportation and accomodations in Sarasota County for onsite studies and activities. Compensation for travel costs is negotiable. 2) Must have completed entomology coursework and/or faculty mentor for insect ID activities. 3) Must be motivated to accomplish independent activities that will support the goals of the research grant.
Starting Date: 09/01/05
Ending Date: 11/15/05
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Required
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Required
Principal Investigator: Pradeep Kumar
Field of Research: Physics
Phone Number: (352) 392-6690
E-mail: pkumar@ufl.edu
Project Description: My primary reserach is in the theory of superconductivity and magnetism. I am also involved in some collaborations with Los Alamos National Lab on nano scale phenomena.
Requirements: An ideal applicant would be a physics major with some facility with computers. I can work with people who are familiar with differential equations and numerical methods, though perhaps not quantum mechancs.
Starting Date: May 1, 2001
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 1-2
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Mark Law
Field of Research: Electrical Engineering
Phone Number: 352 392-0912
E-mail: law@tec.ufl.edu
Project Description: I do research on integrated circuit fabrication and devices. I have a range of projects developing models for how semiconductor devices and processes behave. Some experimental work is also possible.
Requirements: I need students that have had differential equations, some computer programming, and a transistor device physics course.
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Dr. Carol J. Lehtola
Field of Research: Agricultural Engineering
Phone Number: 392-1864
E-mail: cjlehtola@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: On-going projects in the area of agricultural safety and health issues; studies of children in agriculture; integrating safety/health into the design of engineering systems (can be tailored to students' interests and background)
Requirements: interest in agricultural safety and health issues and activities; ability to analyze and synthesize info and data.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: not limited
Summer Positions: not limited
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Yuncong Li
Field of Research: Soil and Water Science
Phone Number: 305-246-7000
E-mail: Yunli@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: What is the effect of soil organic amendments on soil fertility and crop production? Overall Objective of Research: Evaluations of soil quality after application of soil amendment.
Requirements: Have soil and water science background and willing to work at Homestead campus.
Starting Date: Open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Required
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jenshan Lin
Field of Research: Wireless Sensor System
Phone Number: 352-392-4929
E-mail: jenshan@ufl.edu
Project Description: The project will build a prototype wireless hydrogen detection system to detect hydrogen leak at a service facility in Orlando. The sensor node consists of a solid-state sensor, a detector circuit, a microcontroller, and a wireless transceiver. The system consists of several of these sensor nodes and a central monitoring station. The central monitoring station has a wireless transceiver collecting the sensor data and a laptop computer processing the sensor data.
Requirements: Knowledge of microcontroller and computer programming. Experience of ordering electronic parts, PCB layout, and building electronic modules.
Starting Date: Immediate
Ending Date: TBD
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 0
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jenshan Lin
Field of Research: Non-contact Vital Sign Sensing
Phone Number: 352-392-4929
E-mail: jenshan@ufl.edu
Project Description: The project will develop a portable device for non-contact vital sign sensing based on microwave Doppler radar. The applications include sleep apnea monitoring, emergency rescue, home healthcare monitoring, and many more.
Requirements: Knowledge of computer programming, labview, matlab. Experience of ordering parts, making PCB, and building electronic modules.
Starting Date: immediate
Ending Date: TBD
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jenshan Lin
Field of Research: Wireless Power Transmission
Phone Number: 352-392-4929
E-mail: jenshan@ufl.edu
Project Description: The project will demonstrate a wireless power transmission system using high power microwave devices and antennas.
Requirements: Knowledge of antennas. Knowledge of RF safety.
Starting Date: immediate
Ending Date: TBD
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 0
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Rick Lind
Field of Research: Aerospace Engineering
Phone Number: 352.392.6745
E-mail: ricklind@ufl.edu
Project Description: The student will adopt biologically-inspired concepts for flight control. Specifically, research will consider morphing, or shape changing, to alter flight dynamics. Projects can consider identification of flight shapes, implementation of mechanisms to mimic those shapes, and computational modeling of the resulting flight dynamics. Research can consider birds, insects, bats, and dinosaur flights as pertaining to micro air vehicles.
Requirements: Student should have a good knowledge of biology of skeletal and muscular systems, mechanical engineering of design and fabrication of servo mechanisms, or aerospace engineering of flight mechanics. The actual requirements will vary with the type of project to be studied.
Starting Date: anytime
Ending Date: anytime
Academic Year Positions: any
Summer Positions: any
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jon Martin
Field of Research: Hydrogeology
Phone Number: 352-392-6219
E-mail: jbmartin@ufl.edu
Project Description: (1) Measure magnitude of submarine ground water discharge into the Indian River Lagoon near Melbourne Florida. Determine water, carbon and other solute fluxes that are associated with the ground water discharge. (2) Assess magnitude of ground and surface water interactions in the Santa Fe River Basin and extent of dissolution of the carbonate rocks caused by the interactions.
Requirements: Strong analytical chemistry background. Good laboratory techniques. Strong likelihood for field work, so should be in good shape. Cheerful disposition and ability to get along with graduate students.
Starting Date: immediately
Ending Date: 2007
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jon Martin
Field of Research: Hydrogeology/Water Chemistry
Phone Number: 352-392-6219
E-mail: jbmartin@ufl.edu
Project Description: Two projects are available: (1) a study of submarine ground water discharge to coastal zones and estuaries, including study of carbon and metal fluxes to the water column, and (2) a study of surface and ground water mixing in carbonate aquifers and the relationship of saturation state of the water to the dissolution of the aquifer minerals. The field areas are local, including the Santa Fe River, Indian River Lagoon, and Tampa Bay.
Requirements: Strong understanding of analytical chemistry, careful laboratory techniques, and skill with databases such as excel are important. Some rigorous field work could be included so an interest in outdoor activities including driving small boats would be valuable.
Starting Date: immediately
Ending Date: 2007
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Corene Matyas
Field of Research: GIS / Meteorology
Phone Number: 392-0494 ext. 211
E-mail: matyas@ufl.edu
Project Description: The project uses radar data to determine where heavy rainfall occurs in landfalling hurricanes. A GIS is used to spatially analyze the rainfall patterns, which is a new approach for this type of work. The results of this project will be used to develop a rainfall forecast model that could be tested at the National Hurricane Center.
Requirements: knowledge of ArcGIS, ability to program with ArcObjects in Visual Basic
Starting Date: October, 2006
Ending Date: May, 2007
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Joseph Meert
Field of Research: Paleomagnetism/Tectonics
Phone Number: 846-2414
E-mail: jmeert@geology.ufl.edu
Project Description: The project traces the motion of India for the time period from 2000 million years ago until 500 million years ago based on the study of fossil magnetism and geochronology. Lab work includes making measurements of core samples, detailing the magnetic mineralogies, separating minerals for geochronologic dating and analyzing the samples.
Requirements: Familiarity with computers and software such as excel. Careful in the laboratory and a willingness to block out at least 3 hours per lab session. 3 hours are needed to start and finish a treatment.
Starting Date: anytime
Ending Date: Dec 2006
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Mark W. Meisel
Field of Research: Physics
Phone Number: 392-9147
E-mail: meisel@phys.ufl.edu
Project Description: 1. The electromagnetic and thermodynamic properties of a variety of novel low dimensional systems are investigated for the purpose of studying the underlying quantum mechanical phenomena. The research focuses on low dimensional organic and inorganic conductors and magnets, nanostructured antiferromagnetic particles, and novel superconducting and heavy fermion materials. 2. Biophysical research involves the study of plants growing in strong magnetic fields and in low gravity environments generated by magnetic levitation.
Requirements: Undergraduate students should be highly motivated and able to work in both individual and team arrangements. Typically, students should maintain a GPA above 3.5.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 1 to 2
Summer Positions: 1 to 4
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: David A. Micha
Field of Research: Chemistry, Physics, Chemical Physics
Phone Number: 392-6977
E-mail: micha@qtp.ufl.edu
Project Description: Theoretical and computational aspects, visualization and animation of molecular interactions in the gas phase and at solid surfaces. Electron transfer phenomena. Photodesorption. Femtosecond spectroscopy and kinetics.
Requirements: Physical Chemistry or Atomic molecular Physics; programming with FORTRAN; some knowledge of UNIX OPSs.
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Russell F. Mizell
Field of Research: Entomology
Phone Number: 850-875-7156
E-mail: rfmizell@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: My research is very broad and deals in general with insect biology and behavior, interactions between plant pathogens, their insect vectors and plant physiology, biological control and ecology.
Requirements: Driver's license, capable of field work, background in science or math, computer skills helpful.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Kimberly Moore
Field of Research: Floriculture Production
Phone Number: 954-577-6328
E-mail: klock@ufl.edu
Project Description: The goal of my research is to investigate the effects of production techniques and the environment on the growth and development of bedding plants and other flowering crops. A significant portion of my research investigates the use of alternative growing substrates such as compost. I also am working on optimizing fertilization recommendations. A new project I am involved in is trialing bedding plants for south Florida. In addition, I am also evaluating the water and fertilizer requirements of ornamentals plants in the used in the landscape in south FL.
Requirements: Applicant must be a self-starter and able to work independently. The applicant also must be able to get to the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center to work on projects.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Joann Mossa
Field of Research: Geography/Geomorphology
Phone Number: 352-392-0494
E-mail: mossa@geog.ufl.edu
Project Description: Using geospatial data sets, we are examining rates of channel change in floodplains with differing physical characteristics (geology, slope, sinuousity) and differing types and degrees of disturbances associated with sand and gravel mining.
Requirements: Need to have at least GEO 3151C (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems) or its equivalent (Experience with ArcGIS and ArcView mapping software). Coursework in physical geography, geographic techniques and/or geology desirable.
Starting Date: continuing
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: variable
Summer Positions: variable
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Paul Mueller
Field of Research: Geology/Geochemistry
Phone Number: 392-2231
E-mail: mueller@geology.ufl.edu
Project Description: Geochemical Evolution of Continental Crust This project involves the study of ancient rock sequences in order to ascertain the extent to which they are likely to have been produced by the same processes that generate continental crust today. We use elemental and isotopic studies, including radiometric geochronology, to constrain the records of these processes. We are currently working with sequences in SW Montana that are 2.8 to 3.5 billion years old, and sequences from the southern Appalachian Mountains that range from 0.6 to 1.4 billion years old.
Requirements: Need to have at least GLY 2010C or its equivalent, and have at least started the freshman chemistry sequence
Starting Date: continuing
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: variable
Summer Positions: variable
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Philip Neuhoff
Field of Research: Geochemistry/Physical Chemistry
Phone Number: 846-2413
E-mail: neuhoff@ufl.edu
Project Description: We explore fundamental chemical processes controlling the evolution of the earth's surface and upper crust. Current research projects involve experimental and geological sample-based studies of thermodynamic properties and chemical phase relations, thermodynamic properties, and reaction rates. Students can obtain training in laboratory studies of reactions between minerals and aqueous solutions, calorimetric measurements of thermodynamic properties, and petrographic and chemical analysis of geological samples.
Requirements: Introductory geology and mineralogy helpful; freshman chemistry required. Dedication and commitment a must.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Recent developments in electronic technologies extensively demand ceramics with good dielectric properties, including intermediate dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and low temperature coefficient of capacitance. It is well known that structure and processing are two main factors determining properties. Current investigation explores the fundamental relationships between dielectric properties and crystal structure to further search for the potential candidates for dielectric ceramics. The crystal structure of the series of rare earth niobate compounds Ln3NbO7 changes from orthorhombic weberite-type structures to a cubic defect fluorite structure with decreasing ionic radius. Ln2(Ln’, Nb)O7 (where the ionic radius of Ln’3+ is smaller than that of Ln3+) and Ln2(M1/3Nb2/3)O7 (M = Zn or Mg) compounds are expected to crystallize into pyrochlore. The variation in structure for above compounds as well as an approximately linear relationship between the polarizability and the ionic radius of Ln3+ provide an ideal stage to study the correlation between polarizability and dielectric properties in fluorite-related structure.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: INERT MATRIX MATERIALS FOR NUCLEAR FUELS- Management of the increasing amounts of plutonium and minor actinides that are generated as a result of dismantled nuclear weapons as well as the nuclear fuel cycle has received a great deal of attention in the past few years. As a potential transmutation solution, the concept of an inert matrix fuel (IMF) was introduced where the fertile nuclides such as 238U are substituted by a non-fertile matrix, thus eliminating the generation of additional Pu. Candidate matrix materials must meet several critical requirements, including high temperature stability, good radiation resistance, high thermal conductivity, good corrosion resistance under hot water and the suitability to undergo aqueous reprocessing. An MgO-Pyrochlore ceramic-ceramic (cercer) composite has been proposed as an IMF candidate; as part of the ongoing assessment of its potential, the hot water resistance and aqueous reprocessing of the cercer composite is being investigated. Furthermore, although significant improvement in current IMF composites is essential, further exploration for a single phase IMF is of great interest. From the out-of-pile properties of MgAl2O4 it can be inferred that other oxides with the spinel crystal structure may be potential candidates for inert matrix materials.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS FOR HYPERTHERMIA CANCER TREATMENT (In collaboration with Professor C. Batich)- Liver cancer remains a devastating disease with very poor outcomes unless it is localized enough to be surgically removed. Lipiodol is used as an x-ray contrast agent to identify metastases to the liver, since it localizes specifically to such lesions. This project evaluates the novel use of non-toxic ferroelectric (FE) particles for the selective destruction of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue through targeted hyperthermia using an externally applied field. Use of FE particles shows advantages over the more commonly researched ferromagnetic (FM) particles, and essentially nothing has been published attempting to use them in this way. However, several key aspects of FE particles for targeted hyperthermia remain to be addressed. Such as preparation methods and heating rates. This project uses a simple capacitive plate system to generate radiofrequency (RF) electric fields. It is very likely that FE's with lipiodol would exhibit good heat production and temperature-limiting behavior. The three goals include (1) synthesis and characterization (thermal and solubility) of GS ferroelectric crystals, (2) testing particles in an agar phantom within a capacitive hyperthermia system (CHT) that will selectively heat the ferroelectric particle systems developed in Aim 1 with lipiodol, and (3) preliminary delivery testing of satisfactory embolic compositions in a rat model of colorectal metastases to the liver.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: ELECTROMECHANICAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC MEMS TRANSDUCERS- A conventional ultrasonic imaging system includes two elements: 1) an element that generates acoustic waves, and 2) a sensor that detects the reflected signals. In a typical ultrasonic imaging procedure, a probe is manually scanned across the imaging area. This procedure can be tedious and time consuming, and often the image quality is poor. This project involves creating a piezoelectric device structure for improved acoustic wave sensing. This is accomplished by building the device using different materials for different components such as a piezoelectric thin-film transistor.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: SYNTHESIS OF CERAMIC FOAMS WITH CONTROLLED MICRO- AND MESOSTRUCTURE- This project proposes the use of a 2-component liquid polyurethane system to synthesize BaTiO3-based ceramic foam. By paying special attention to the processing, we are trying to control the outcome of the microstructure in order to effect the properties of the foam.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C. Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: (352) 846 3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Rational Design of Cathode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This research program investigates composition-electrical conductivity relationships in ruthenate pyrochlore compounds (A2Ru2O7). In particular, compositions with two cations in the A-site or (A’,A’’)2Ru2O7 are being investigated as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C. Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Current proton exchange membranes (PEM) are based on polymeric materials such as perfluorosulfonic acid (Nafion). The operation of these membranes is currently limited to below 100°C due to their glass transition temperatures and required presence of water (50% relative humidity or above) to obtain high proton conduction. These characteristics preclude the efficient utilization of current PEMs in fuel cells for transportation where operating temperatures of 120°C or above are highly desirable. Therefore, to overcome these limitations, this project will focus on the development of new advanced ceramic PEM materials that can operate at intermediate temperatures (above 120°C) and low partial pressure of water vapor. The principal objective of this project is to develop a PEM material that meets the technical requirements for the next generation of PEM fuel cells (such as DoE FreedomCAR 2010 technical targets). Specifically, this project deals with the synthesis compounds in the family of pyrophosphates AP2O7, and doped eulytites ((A,B)4(PO4)3), the characterization of their proton conductivity, and assesses their potential as membrane materials for the next generation of PEM fuel cells.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Juan C. Nino
Field of Research: Materials Science and Engineering
Phone Number: 352-846-3787
E-mail: jnino@mse.ufl.edu
Project Description: Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are considered to be the most desirable fuel cell to generate electricity from hydrocarbon fuels. This is because they are highly efficient, tolerant to impurities, environmentally friendly and corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized ZrO2 electrolyte, operates around 1000oC to ensure low ohmic losses. In order to decrease the operating temperature, decrease the cost, increase the ionic conductivity and thermal stability, a co-dopant strategy based on ionic radii, dielectric polarizability and charge valence are used to investigate the effect on the grain ionic conductivity of doped ceria electrolytes.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Gary Peter
Field of Research: Bioengineering, Biomechanics, Genetics
Phone Number: 846-0896
E-mail: gfpeter@ufl.edu
Project Description: Understanding the genes that control the mechanical properties of biomaterials is an exciting area of investigation in bioengineering. We are conducting a project that aims to understand what controls the tensile strength of plant organs, tissues and cells. A genetic screen is planned to identify genes that control tensile strength in plant stems.
Requirements: Advanced undergraduate in biological sciences, physics or engineering. Enjoys working independently and with a team. Need GPA of 3.2 or better in science courses.
Starting Date: 1/1/03
Ending Date: 5/1/04
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jorg Peters
Field of Research: Computer Graphics
Phone Number:
E-mail: jorg@cise.ufl.edu
Project Description: Modeling and animation of 3-dimensional objects; use of force-feedback mechanisms
Requirements: solid understanding of linear algebra and calculus; willingness to learn graphics tools; ability to program (in C or C++ or Matlab)
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: James F. Preston
Field of Research: Microbiology, Biochemistry
Phone Number: 392-5923
E-mail: jpreston@ufl.edu
Project Description: Molecular mechanisms involved in the biocontrol of phytopathogenic nematodes by Pasteuria spp. Pasteuria spp. are endospore-forming bacteria that include obligate parasites of phytopathogenic nematodes. A major objective of our work is to define the basis of host specificity of different Pasteuria isolates for different nematode hosts. The goal of this effort is to develop protocols to apply Pasteuria spp. as alternatives to chemical nematicides, e.g. methyl bromide, for the control of root-knot and other phytopathogenic nematodes. This is a part of a collaborative effort with faculty in the Departments of Entomology and Nematology, and Microbiology and Cell Science, that includes sequencing the genome of Pasteuria penetrans and applying the tools of bioinformatics for its further development as a biological nematicide. Student research projects include the determination of specific gene expression during nematode infection, and the biochemical characterization of adhesins involved in the attachment of Pasteuria endospores to nematode hosts.
Requirements: Courses through organic chemistry and microbiology are required, with a GPA of 3.2 and B or better performance in science courses.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: two
Summer Positions: two
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: James F. Preston
Field of Research: Microbiology, Biochemistry
Phone Number: 392-5923
E-mail: jpreston@ufl.edu
Project Description: Selection of bacterial enzymes for the depolymerization of plant biomass and its fermentative conversion to alternative fuels and bio-based products. Recent efforts are directed at the selection of enzymes that can effectively process the glucuronoxylan polymers of the hemicellulose fraction of hardwoods and crop residues. The goal of this effort, which is a collaboration with other faculty participating in the Metabolic Engineering Program in the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, is to develop cost-effective processes for the conversion of underutilized resources to ethanol. Projects available for undergraduate student research include the identification, cloning, and sequencing of bacterial genes encoding endoxylanases and glucuronidases, and the overexpression of these to produce sufficient quantities of enzymes for catalytic and structural investigation.
Requirements: Courses through organic chemistry and microbiology are required, with a GPA of 3.2 and B or better performance in science courses.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: two
Summer Positions: two
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Kenneth Quesenberry
Field of Research: Genetics and Plant Breeding
Phone Number: 352-392-1811 ext 213
E-mail: clover@ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: We conduct ongoing research projects aimed at genetic improvement of tropical and temperate forage plants. The projects include field, greenhouse, and laboratory investigations of nematode, plant disease, and insect resistance, investigations of transgene expression and inheritance, and manipulation of chromosome numbers. Current laboratory projects involve development of tissue culture protocols for regeneration of native forage legumes from callus tissue culture, manipulation of chromosome numbers in various tropical forages, and methods for genetic transformation of these species. Greenhouse projects are related to doubling the chromosome numbers of Trifolium polymorphum, T. reflesum, and Paspalum notatum. Field projects involve germplasm evaluation of Lotononis bainesii and various native legumes, evaluation of bahiagrass for turf and forage quality, and evaluation of ploidy effects in red clover.
Requirements: Highly motivated, self starting, individual with interest in biological sciences, especially classical and modern genetics. Prefer that student has had some college level biology, micro- biology, and/or genetics.
Starting Date: Open ended
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Sanjay Ranka
Field of Research: Computer Science
Phone Number:
E-mail: ranka@cise.ufl.edu
Project Description: For many data-intensive applications, the data is distributed across geographically distributed storage systems and owned by multiple organizations. Each organization has policies that limit access to their data. This project is on developing algorithms and middleware that will enable users to seamlessly explore and mine information in the above environment while allowing data owners to guarantee data privacy constraints of their organizations.
Requirements:
Starting Date: All year
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Sanjay Ranka
Field of Research: Computer Science
Phone Number: 392 6838
E-mail: ranka@cise.ufl.edu
Project Description: Numerical and structural chromosomal imbalances are one of the most prominent and pathogenetically relevant features of neoplastic cells. Over the last decades, thousands of (molecular-) cytogenetic studies of human neoplasias have led to important insights into the genetic mechanisms of tumor development and description of targets for pharmacologic intervention. For example, repetitive chromosomal aberration patterns reflect the supposed cooperation of a multitude of tumor relevant genes in most malignant diseases. One method for measuring the genomic aberrations is the Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH). This method measures gain or loss of genetic material (or genomic interval) at genomic scale. Thus CGH data for a chromosome of an individual can be considered as an ordered list of real numbers, where each number corresponds to a genomic interval. Each number is positive, negative, or zero if there is gain, loss, or no aberration observed for the corresponding genomic interval respectively. Usually, the status (i.e., gain, loss, or no change) of each genomic interval is kept rather than the magnitude of aberrations. We also use this strategy and represent gain, loss, and no change with +1, -1, and 0 respectively throughout the paper. For simplicity, we map the CGH data for all the chromosomes of an individual to a single list of of integers by concatenating the CGH data of all the chromosomes. We are investigating data mining methods for clustering, classification and prediction.
Requirements:
Starting Date: 11/1/2005
Ending Date: 11/1/2007
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Saba B. Rathinasabapathi
Field of Research: Plant physiology and weed science
Phone Number: (352)392-3991
E-mail: brath@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: Flavonoids are secondary compounds implicated in a variety of functions. Some of the flavonoids made by plants have positive or negative influence on other species of plants growing nearby. This phenomenon is known as allelopathy. In a research project specifically designed for undergraduates, students get opportunities to collect plants and discover novel flavonoids that show allelopathic activity.
Requirements: No previous experience in research required.
Starting Date: Anytime
Ending Date: -
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Jimmy Rich
Field of Research: Nematology
Phone Number: 850-875-7130
E-mail: jrich@ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: Plant-parasitic nematodes are major pests of all cultivated crops including turf and ornamentals. The research program is designed to develop sustainable management procedures to limit losses to these pests. Students will have the option to work in one or more of the ongoing research programs which specifically emphasize nematode management in tomato, watermelon, peanut, cotton, and some ornamentals. Nematode extraction and handling techniques will be taught as well as field experiment design and data collection.
Requirements: The UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) is located in Quincy, FL (near Tallahassee). Because of the distance, students from the area may be most suitable for work in the program. However, free student housing (as space is available) is located on the NFREC campus.
Starting Date: Anytime, summer best
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions: two
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Donald Rockwood
Field of Research: Forest Resources
Phone Number: 352 846-0897
E-mail: dlrock@ufl.edu
Project Description: Short rotation woody crop (SRWC) systems involving fast growing species such as Eucalyptus and cottonwood have numerous applications including production of mulchwood and energywood, ecological restoration of mined lands, and phytoremediation. Research opportunities are available in genetic improvement of these fast growing trees and in economic and environmental evaluation of SRWC systems. (visit www.treepower.org for one example of SRWC systems)
Requirements: Coursework in biology or equivalent experience.
Starting Date: Open
Ending Date: Ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 1-2
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: John Sabin
Field of Research: physics, theory
Phone Number: 392-1597
E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu
Project Description: When fast ions collide with matter, they loose energy to the target. This process forms the basis of processes as diverse as radiation treatment of tumors and ion implantation production of microelectronics. This project involvs the theoretical and computational study of energy deposition.
Requirements: Students must have had modern physics or physical chemistry, and be competent computer users.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 1 or 2
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Masoud Salyani
Field of Research: Agricultural Engineering/ Spray Technology
Phone Number: 863/956-1151
E-mail: msi@crec.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: The following projects, in the area of pesticide application technology, can be tailored to student’s background and interest: Spray droplet atomization and transport Sprayer design and pesticide application techniques Spray deposition and drift from ground and aerial applications Spray mass balance and droplet dispersion in the environment Spray deposition model for air-carrier sprayers Variable rate technologies in agrochemical applications
Requirements: background in mathematics, mechanics, and computer software; ability to collect and analyze data; willingness to work under field conditions.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 0
Summer Positions: 1 - 2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Masoud Salyani
Field of Research: Agricultural Engineering/ Spray Technology
Phone Number: 863/ 956-1151
E-mail: msi@crec.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: The following projects, in the area of pesticide application technology, can be tailored to student’s background and interest: Spray droplet atomization and transport Sprayer design and pesticide application techniques Spray deposition and drift from ground and aerial applications Spray mass balance and droplet dispersion in the environment Spray deposition model for air-carrier sprayers Variable rate technologies in agrochemical applications
Requirements: Background in mathematics, mechanics, and computer software; ability to collect and analyze data; willingness to work under field conditions.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 0
Summer Positions: 1-2
Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Principal Investigator: Justin Sanchez
Field of Research: Biomedical Engineering
Phone Number: 352-392-4827
E-mail: sanchjc@peds.ufl.edu
Project Description: The goal of the NRG is to develop state-of-the-art novel medical treatments by operating at the interface between basic neural engineering research and clinical care. This direction of research is motivated by the potential of direct neural interfaces for delivering therapy and restoring functionality to disabled individuals using engineering principles. Two clinical outcomes of the lab’s mission are to restore movement to the paralyzed and control epileptic seizures. The mechanism by which we can achieve these outcomes is through the sampling of large ensembles of cells from the cortex and deep brain structures, from which we have a window of opportunity to study the functional relationships of neural systems (motor system, limbic system). The process of transitioning this technology into a clinically useful device will require two parallel paths of research. In the first path, experimental paradigms involving microelectrode array recordings in behaving animals will be developed in conjunction with signal processing techniques for studying the unknown aspects of neural coding and functional neurophysiology. These signal processing techniques will then be implemented in portable, low-power, wireless hardware (electrodes, DSPs) that is feasible for a clinical implementation of a BMI. The second path, high-density array ECoG recordings in humans, provides a less invasive technique for neural interfaces however it still remains unknown how to extract BMI control signatures that are sufficiently spatially and temporally resolved. Moreover, it will be critical to obtain feedback about interactions of the individual’s intent and the engineered interface; a necessary condition for improving the performance of the interface. Ultimately, it will take the culmination of new functional neurophysiologic knowledge, clinical interaction, signal processing, and low-power, portable electronics to demonstrate the clinical utility for human subjects.
Requirements:
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Malisa Sarntinoranont
Field of Research: Mechanical/Biomedical Engineering
Phone Number: 352-392-8404
E-mail: msarnt@ufl.edu
Project Description: Aid in the developement of predictive models of macromolecular drug delivery. Students will study the impact of interstitial fluid flows on the convective and diffusive transport of drugs as they move through the interstitial space of soft tissues such as nervous, tumor, or arterial tissues.
Requirements: The student should have an interest in solving biomedical engineering problems. In addition she/he should have taken a course in ordinary differential equations and be familiar with matlab.
Starting Date: summer 2004
Ending Date: spring 2005
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Rick Schoellhorn
Field of Research: Flowering Plants - Floriculture
Phone Number: 352-392-1831 Ext 364
E-mail: rksch@ufl.edu
Project Description: A variety of projects relating to evaluation and development of new garden plants for the Florida landscape and production industry. Projects range from: Weekly monitoring and evaluation of trial plantings (digital photography and simple data) Work with plant breeding techniques and evaluation (both traditional pollination and advanced through mutation breeding projects). Greenhouse or production based research such as comparing different fertilizers, plant growth regulating chemicals, or daylength treatment effects on plant growth and flowering. We also do a lot of work with cut flower crops, molecular genetics, and other applied floriculture projects and are happy to work with students to shape a project that is best suited to their interests.
Requirements: Honors projects. Independent study projects. All applicants must be self-starters with a positive attitude and the ability to manage their own projects and work well with others. Specific requirements for any project will made clear up front.
Starting Date: All semesters
Ending Date: usually one semester in duration
Academic Year Positions: 6
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Johan Scholberg
Field of Research: Crop nutrition/environmental quality
Phone Number: (352) 392 1811 ext 230
E-mail: jmscholberg@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: Meeting the challenge of ensuring world-wide food security while preserving existing ecosystems for future generations requires innovative research approaches. This research program uses new methods for measuring plant water and nutrient uptake and will provide information that is essential for the development of sustainable and environmentally-friendly crop production practices. Projects include both greenhouse and field experiments for a number of agricultural crops and productions systems. We will built custom-designed water- and nutrient-uptake monitoring systems that allow accurate measurement of the effects soil and climate conditions on plant water and nutrients use. Data will be analyzed and used to determine the effects of environmental conditions on nutrient- and water-use by agricultural crops. Integrating this information into a computer-based information support system will allow farmers to develop crop management plans tailored to their production system and will reduce both production cost and environmental contamination.
Requirements: Applicants should have a background in biological and/or physical science and be interested in one or more of the following topics: crop nutrition, crop physiology, crop management, environmental quality, sustainable agriculture.
Starting Date: open
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 2
Summer Positions: 2
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Eric Schwartz
Field of Research: Robotics/Electrical Engineering/Computer Engineering/Mechanical Engineering
Phone Number: 392-2541
E-mail: ems@mil.ufl.edu
Project Description: The National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) at the Machine Intellegence Laboratory (MIL) at UF uses the design and implementation of autonomous agents (robots) to facilitate research and problem solving in a variety of engineering fields. In this summer internship, the student researchers will design, develop and construct robots. Generally, each student will create his/her own robot will be part of a team to create another robot. Participants will also study, develop and test novel machine learning algorithms through implementation on their platforms. We will carefully guide team participants in the process of development and testing of modern machine learning paradigms, thereby catapulting participants in the midst of state-of-the-art machine learning research.
Requirements: Any undergraduate student who is enrolled in a degree program (part-time or full-time) leading to a bachelor's degree in Engineering or Computer Science, who is a citizen or a permanent resident of the United States and its possessions is eligible and encouraged to apply. Applications from qualified women, Native Americans, African Americans, Native Pacific Islanders, Hispanics and persons with disabilities are highly encouraged. The internship is a full-time position, so selected students can NOT take any cousework during the internship period.
Starting Date: May 9, 2005
Ending Date: August 5, 2005
Academic Year Positions: 6 at UF, 6 from elsewhere
Summer Positions: 6 at UF, 6 from elsewhere
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Eric Schwartz
Field of Research: Robotics, Autonomous Mobile Agents
Phone Number: 392-2541
E-mail: ems@mil.ufl.edu
Project Description: We build autonomous mobile agents (robots) that swim (submarines and boats), robots that move on the ground (rolling, walking, slithering, etc.) and robots that fly (airplanes, hot air baloons, blimps, micro-air vehicles). Students in the Machine Intelligence Laboratory (MIL) have built hundreds of different robots over the last several years and we are actively involved in building more. If you are interested in helping to research, design, fabricate, test and demonstrate new robots, we would like to have your help. Check out http://mil.ufl.edu/ for examples of our work.
Requirements: Enthusiasm, interest in robotics,
Starting Date: oepn
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: open
Summer Positions: open
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Charles Taylor
Field of Research: High-Performance Computing and Grid Technologies
Phone Number: (353) 392-4036
E-mail: taylor@hpc.ufl.edu
Project Description: The UF HPC Center is responsible for the design and implementation of a high-perfromance computing and data storage grid linking multiple HPC clusters across the UF campus. Multiple opportunities exist for projects such as interface development, portal design and implementation, performance analysis and tuning, algorithm development and parallelization.
Requirements: Strong programming skills (preferably C and/or Java) Experience with Linux Some knowledge or TCP/IP-based networks Interest in and enthusiasm for high-performance computing
Starting Date: Immediately
Ending Date: Ongoing
Academic Year Positions: 3
Summer Positions: 3
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: C. Eduardo Vallejos
Field of Research: Genetics, Plant Molecular Biology
Phone Number: 392-1928 x 321
E-mail: vallejos@ufl.edu
Project Description: Survey of DNA sequence variation in the common bean using the Polymerase Chain Reaction We have constructed a genetic linkage map of the common bean with hybridization-based DNA markers. These markers are know as RFLP which stands for restriction fragment length polymorphisms; although RFLPs are the most reliable type of marker, they are expensive and laborious to obtain. The objective of this project is convert these markers into PCR-based markers, which are easy and relatively inexpensive to analyze. Towards this end, all 220 clones for RFLP markers have been sequenced, and PCR-suitable primers have been obtained to amplify the corresponding sequences. We need to survey the PCR amplification products for polymorphisms among different cultivated and wild accessions of the common bean. Results from these efforts can be easily coupled with other projects aimed at the genetic mapping of various genes that control resistance to potyviruses.
Requirements: I would like to considered students that are willing to commit to working on one of these projects for at least one semester. Some background in general biology and genetics or biochemistry, and previous lab experience are desirable, but not essential.
Starting Date: 9/1/05
Ending Date: 8/31/06
Academic Year Positions: 1
Summer Positions: 1
Independent Study: Required
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: Wagner Vendrame
Field of Research: Ornamental Plant Production, Tissue Culture, and Micropropagation
Phone Number: 305-246-7001 ext. 210
E-mail: wavendrame@ifas.ufl.edu
Project Description: The main area of research is Environmental Horticulture. Projects available involve ornamental plant production and conservation, with focus on plant tissue culture and cryopreservation. Potential areas of research include the development of protocols for micropropagation of ornamental plants, including orchids, native plants, woody species, flowering trees,palms and others. Additional projects involve the use of cryopreservation for the long-term storage of plant tissues and/or organs for conservation purposes. We have a particular focus on orchid research and current projects involve clonal propagation of orchids, cryopreservation of orchid seeds and pollen, and evaluation of cultural practices in orchids. Future projects involve the use of DNA technology as related to the areas cited above, including DNA fingerprinting techniques and studies of genetic relationships among individuals. We are flexible and open to work with students that are creative and can bring new ideas for research in Environmental Horticulture.
Requirements: Basic knowledge of plant sciences and the motivation to lead a project on one of the areas mentioned above. Some projects may involve greenhouse/shadehouse and/or field work, but most projects include laboratory work. Specific requirements for each particular project are discussed up front. Environmental Horticulture students are a must and will have the opportunity to gain training in advanced techniques in the areas mentioned above. The work has to be performed at the Tropical Research and Education Center (TREC), in Homestead, FL (South Florida, South of Miami). Student residence at low cost can be arranged at TREC upon availability.
Starting Date: Open
Ending Date: Open
Academic Year Positions: 3-4
Summer Positions: 2-3
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Available
Principal Investigator: David C. Wilson
Field of Research: mathematics/Cardiology
Phone Number: 846-0451
E-mail: dcw@math.ufl.edu
Project Description: Refinement of echocardiographic images for automatic diagnostics of heart difficulties such as myocardial ischemia.
Requirements: math/computer science/statistics
Starting Date:
Ending Date:
Academic Year Positions:
Summer Positions:
Independent Study: Available
Work Study:
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer:
Principal Investigator: Andrew Zimmerman
Field of Research: Geology, Geochemistry
Phone Number: 392-0070
E-mail: azimmer@geology.ufl.edu
Project Description: Mineral mesopores (2-50 nm diameter) have been proposed as sites of organic matter preservation. The mechanism of preservation by mesopores may be related to the size exclusion of organic matter-degrading bacterial exoenzymes. This project will evaluate the presence of mesopores in natural materials and conduct adsorption/desorption experiments using both synthetic and natural nonporous and mesoporous sorbents. These experiments will be coupled to spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses to investigate OM-mineral interactions in these aqueous systems. This fundamental research will have important implications in the fields of global carbon cycling and climate change, microbial ecology, petroleum geochemistry, soil science and organic contaminant remediation. I am looking for an undergraduate to start by examining the porasity of natural materials using a BET surface area analyzer and possibly continue other parts of the project over the years. Co-authorship is a possibility.
Requirements: A background in chemistry. An interest in chemical analysis.
Starting Date: after 6/04
Ending Date: open
Academic Year Positions: 2?
Summer Positions: 2?
Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Available
Salary: Available
Volunteer: Not Available